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Sycamore Review

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  • Book Title: Sycamore Review
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  • Category: American literature
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  • Format & Number of pages: book
  • Synopsis: CHRIS DREW recently recieved his M.F.A. in Creative Writing from Oregon State University and is now pursuing a Ph.D. ... God (Hourglass Books, 2007) and The Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Nonfiction (Simon and Schuster, 2007).

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Sycamore review

Sycamore review

Sycamore Review is a major American literary journal based at Purdue University in West Lafayette. Indiana. It is well-known for its interviews with such established writers as Nick Hornby and Michael Martone. Each year, the journal awards the prestigious Wabash Prizes for Fiction and Poetry.

Notable writers who have contributed to this journal include Cindy May Murphy. Laura van den Berg. Jacob M. Appel and Jim Daniels .

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Articles

Sycamore Review

2016 Wabash Prizes in Fiction and Poetry OPEN NOW

Final Fiction Judge: Adam Johnson

Final Poetry Judge: Reginald Dwayne Betts

First Prize: $1000 and publication in Sycamore Review

GUIDELINES FOR SUBMISSIONS

Submission Deadline: November 15th, 2016 (Contest opens October 1, 2016)

1. For each submission, send one fiction piece and/or up to three poems of no more than six total pages (all poems should be compiled into a single document).

2. A reading fee of $20 (submitted online) must accompany each submission. The reading fee includes a copy of the prize issue.

3. Additional pieces may be submitted separately (paying the $20 fee for each additional submission).

4. Manuscript pages should be numbered and should include the title of the piece.

5. All entries will be read blind. Information that identifies the author should NOT appear on the manuscript itself.

6. All work must be previously unpublished.

7. Simultaneous submissions are acceptable only if Sycamore Review is notified immediately upon acceptance elsewhere.

8. Each piece will be read by at least two Sycamore staffers, with the winner selected by the category’s final judge (Adam Johnson for fiction, Reginald Dwayne Betts for poetry).

9. All contest submissions will be considered for regular inclusion in Sycamore Review.

10. When submitting, be sure to select the Wabash Prize for Fiction or else the Wabash Prize for Poetry option on Submittable.

Once your work has been submitted, you will be redirected to our secure payment website. Submissions will not be considered without an accompanying payment.

If you are not redirected for payment, chances are you accidentally submitted through the regular submission channel. If this is the case, withdraw your work and resubmit, being careful to select the Wabash Prize option.

Submit your work by visiting our online submission manager.

2017 Wabash Prize in Non-Fiction OPENS IN SPRING

First Prize: $1000 and publication in Sycamore Review

GUIDELINES FOR SUBMISSIONS

Submission Deadline: TBA, Normally Opens in February

1. For each submission, send one non-fiction piece.

2. A reading fee of $20 (submitted online) must accompany each submission. The reading fee includes a copy of the prize issue.

3. Additional pieces may be submitted separately (paying the $20 fee for each additional submission).

4. Manuscript pages should be numbered and should include the title of the piece.

5. All entries will be read blind. Information that identifies the author should NOT appear on the manuscript itself.

6. All work must be previously unpublished.

7. Simultaneous submissions are acceptable only if Sycamore Review is notified immediately upon acceptance elsewhere.

8. Each piece will be read by at least two Sycamore staffers, with the winner selected by the final judge.

9. All contest submissions will be considered for regular inclusion in Sycamore Review.

10. When submitting, be sure to select the Wabash Prize for Non-Fiction option on Submittable.

Once your work has been submitted, you will be redirected to our secure payment website. Submissions will not be considered without an accompanying payment.

If you are not redirected for payment, chances are you accidentally submitted through the regular submission channel. If this is the case, withdraw your work and resubmit, being careful to select the Wabash Prize option.

Submit your work by visiting our online submission manager.

Judges

Michelle Tea (Nonfiction 2016)

Janet Burroway (Fiction, Fall 2015)

Mary Szybist (Poetry, Fall 2015)

Kelly Link (Fiction, Spring 2015)

Bob Hicok (Poetry 2014)

Leslie Jamison (Nonfiction 2014)

Rebecca Makkai (Fiction 2014)

C.D. Wright (Poetry 2013)

Cheryl Strayed (Nonfiction 2013)

Charles Baxter (Fiction 2013)

Louise Glück (Poetry 2012)

Antonya Nelson (Fiction 2011)

Jane Hirshfield (Poetry 2010)

Peter Ho Davies (Fiction 2010)

Mark Doty (Poetry 2009)

Tobias Wolff (Fiction 2009)

Billy Collins (Poetry 2008)

Richard Bausch (Fiction 2008)

Eavan Boland (Poetry 2007)

Dan Chaon (Fiction 2007)

Ellen Bryant Voigt (Poetry 2006)

Janet Burroway (Fiction 2006)

Tony Hoagland (Poetry 2005)

Winners

Kristen Nichols (Nonfiction 2016)

Alexander Lumens (Fiction 2015)

Jody Rambo (Poetry 2015)

John Englehardt (Fiction 2014)

Cintia Santana (Poetry 2013)

Richard Froude (Nonfiction 2013)

Angie Kim (Fiction 2013)

Maya Jewell Zeller (Poetry 2012)

Joe B. Sills (Fiction 2011)

Nancy K. Pearson (Poetry 2010)

Adam Prince (Fiction 2010)

Lizzie Hutton (Poetry 2009)

Rachel Furey (Fiction 2009)

Jim Tilley (Poetry 2008)

Matthew Simmons (Fiction 2008)

Jude Nutter (Poetry 2007)

Jacob M. Appel (Fiction 2007)

Cindy May Murphy (Poetry 2006)

Jeff P. Jones (Fiction 2006)

Anna Journey (Poetry 2005)

Judges

Michelle Tea (Nonfiction 2016)

Janet Burroway (Fiction, Fall 2015)

Mary Szybist (Poetry, Fall 2015)

Kelly Link (Fiction, Spring 2015)

Bob Hicok (Poetry 2014)

Leslie Jamison (Nonfiction 2014)

Rebecca Makkai (Fiction 2014)

C.D. Wright (Poetry 2013)

Cheryl Strayed (Nonfiction 2013)

Charles Baxter (Fiction 2013)

Louise Glück (Poetry 2012)

Antonya Nelson (Fiction 2011)

Jane Hirshfield (Poetry 2010)

Peter Ho Davies (Fiction 2010)

Mark Doty (Poetry 2009)

Tobias Wolff (Fiction 2009)

Billy Collins (Poetry 2008)

Richard Bausch (Fiction 2008)

Eavan Boland (Poetry 2007)

Dan Chaon (Fiction 2007)

Ellen Bryant Voigt (Poetry 2006)

Janet Burroway (Fiction 2006)

Tony Hoagland (Poetry 2005)

Winners

Kristen Nichols (Nonfiction 2016)

Alexander Lumens (Fiction 2015)

Jody Rambo (Poetry 2015)

John Englehardt (Fiction 2014)

Cintia Santana (Poetry 2013)

Richard Froude (Nonfiction 2013)

Angie Kim (Fiction 2013)

Maya Jewell Zeller (Poetry 2012)

Joe B. Sills (Fiction 2011)

Nancy K. Pearson (Poetry 2010)

Adam Prince (Fiction 2010)

Lizzie Hutton (Poetry 2009)

Rachel Furey (Fiction 2009)

Jim Tilley (Poetry 2008)

Matthew Simmons (Fiction 2008)

Jude Nutter (Poetry 2007)

Jacob M. Appel (Fiction 2007)

Cindy May Murphy (Poetry 2006)

Jeff P. Jones (Fiction 2006)

Anna Journey (Poetry 2005)

Source:

sycamorereview.com

Sycamore Review

Wabash Prize — NOW OPEN!

Final Fiction Judge: Adam Johnson

Final Poetry Judge: Reginald Dwayne Betts

Submissions for the annual Wabash Prize in poetry or fiction are currently only accepted online. If you would like to submit for the prize, please see the separate guidelines on our contest page .

General Reading Period

September 1 – March 31. Submissions sent at other times will go unread. However, during contest periods we do not accept standard submissions in the contest genre. For example, during our fiction and poetry contest that runs from Oct. 1 – Nov. 15, we do not accept standard fiction or poetry submissions. Nonfiction submissions are welcomed, but those poets and fiction writers wishing to be considered for publication during this time should submit to the contest!

Sycamore Review is looking for original poetry, fiction, non-fiction and art (scroll down for our genre editors’ Aesthetic Statements ). We accept unsolicited submissions of fiction, poetry, and non-fiction. Please query for art and book reviews.

At this time we are not able to accept outside interviews, previously published works (except for translations) or genre pieces (conventional science fiction, romance, horror, etc.). Unless explicitly asked by an editor, submit no more than twice per year .

As of August 15 2010, Sycamore Review accepts ONLY online submissions. Mailed submissions will be discarded. In our online submissions system. follow the instructions for creating an account (if this is your first time submitting to SR ), and upload your piece.

Submissions are limited to one work at a time for fiction and non-fiction, and no more than five poems, which should be included in a single document. Please submit a .docx. pdf, or .rtf file and include a cover letter in the comments section. We’d like to know a little bit about you and your work.

We do accept simultaneous submissions, but request prompt notification if the work is accepted elsewhere. When it comes to poetry. you should withdraw your poems if they are accepted for publication elsewhere (or poem as the case may be) by adding a note on Submittable.

Sycamore Review does not publish creative work by any student currently attending Purdue University. Former students should wait one calendar year before submitting.

POETRY manuscripts should be typed single-spaced, one poem to a page. Please submit no more than twice per reading period.

PROSE should be typed double-spaced, with numbered pages and the author’s name and title of the work easily visible on each page. Wait until you have received a response to submit again. Please submit no more than twice per reading period.

NONFICTION should be literary memoir or creative personal essay. Sycamore Review does not publish scholarly articles or journalistic pieces, though we do publish experiential journalism with a memoir bent. We are interested in originality, brevity, significance, strong dialogue, and vivid detail. There is no maximum page count, but remember that the longer the piece is, the more compelling each page must be. Wait until you have received a response to submit again.

TRANSLATION Please submit no more than one story, essay, novel excerpt, or up to five poems. Please submit a .doc or .rtf file only and include a cover letter in the comments section. We’d like to know a little bit about you and your work. Additionally, if the submission is a prose piece, please designate the genre between fiction, non-fiction, or prose poetry/hybrid genre in the cover letter. Translators will be asked to provide a version of any accepted pieces in the source language. Both the translator and the original author will be paid at the standard rate when applicable.

ART Sycamore Review is currently seeking a visual artist for Issue 27.2! Interested artists should email a sample of their work (5-10 high-res images) or link to an online portfolio or personal blog site to Rachel Reynolds, Art Editor, at sycamart@purdue.edu by March 15. Cover letter is optional. All media and mediums welcome.

In most cases, submissions should be withdrawn through our submission manager. For partial poetry withdraws or genre-specific queries, please contact the appropriate editor:

For general questions, please email us at sycamore@purdue.edu or write via post to Sycamore Review. Purdue University, Department of English, 500 Oval Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

Book Reviews

If you are interested in having your recently-published or forthcoming book reviewed either on the website or in the journal, or if you have written a review of a forthcoming book, please contact Book Review Editor, Jake Zucker. at jakedzucker@gmail.com .

Rights & Payment

Purdue University acquires first-time North American rights, including electronic rights, for work published in Sycamore Review. After publication, all rights revert to the author. For unsolicited printed work, Sycamore Review pays each contributor two copies, and $50 per short story or non-fiction piece, or $25 per poem.

Aesthetic Statements

Sycamore Review does not have a permanent aesthetic statement because of the nature of our editorship. That said, our genre editors do have preferences that you, as a potential submitter, might be curious about. Please remember, however, that we are constantly surprised by the pieces we end up liking the most. This, we believe, is one of the great pleasures of literature — its ability to undermine our presuppositions, to open our eyes, to stretch our hearts and minds.

Our Fiction Aesthetic

We’re looking for a wide-ranging diversity of style, content, and vision. Send us stories grand in conception and exacting in execution, written with lush yet precise language; stories that matter, that linger, that challenge assumptions and say something new. – Robert Powers & Gabriela Garcia, Fiction Editors

Our Poetry Aesthetic

I’m looking for poems that I can sink my eyes and teeth into. Poems with an emotional core, poems that open up or fold in, poems that yield new meaning upon looking. Form and not form. Music and mystery. Hybrid and prose poetry welcome. — Alex Mouw & Maryam Ghafoor, Poetry Editors

Our Creative Non-Fiction Aesthetic

I’m looking for CNF essays that are heart-wrenching and/or hilarious but that, at the same time, are a treat to read because of their brilliant language. The best CNF rides the wave of fiction plot lines on a raft of poetic language straight into the reader’s heart and mind because, ultimately, it’s all true. – Samantha Atkins, Creative Non-Fiction Editor

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1, 064, 092 hotels worldwide

Reviews of Sycamore

“Good value, excellent location”

The host was very kind and helpful. The self-service breakfast was Rich and tasty. The hotel is Located at an elite eindhoven location. It is a Green area near the eindhoven centraal station, 10 minute walking.

The Single room was really small, but with all the equipment needed. The hotel is a little bit Hard to find, signs shall be improved.

“Wonderful for kicking back and relaxing in the evenings”

Best value for the money! The location was fantastic, the neighbourhood beautiful, and finally, the rooms! We had the family room which was rather spacious and well-furnished itself and were given a big living room at our own disposal, fully equipped with a record player and a large collection of classic records to listen to in the evenings. There was even a guitar and we regretted that none of us could play it. All in all, if you're looking for a quiet, cozy and laid-back stay, I highly recommend Sycamore. Plus, the owner is a great guy and always up for a friendly chat! He and the always available free tea & coffee in the kitchen made us feel right at home.

“A great stay in a wonderful and green area of Eindhoven”

Wonderfully placed near the centre of Eindhoven. Homely environment.

Placed in a nice street of the city, the owner is a great person, I enjoyed talking to him and I felt like at home. The house is colourful and quiet, tea and coffee is offered to all guests.

I was perfectly fine; I just want to say that if you expect to find always someone ready for you is not the case, but I enjoyed a lot to feel free and like at home.

“Charming B&B in beautiful neighbourhood”

The location in a quiet neighborhood of beautiful big villas. Friendliness of the owner. Cosy kitchen. I stayed with a friend in the family room which was pleasant and comfortable.

A wardrobe for hanging up clothes, or some shelves, would have been nice. The bathroom was very small and basic, but OK. A bit expensive for what you get, compared with hotel standards/prices.

“Perfect for short, Dutch breaks”

I stayed in this guest house for 3 nights in March 2016. The location is perfect. It's within a 15 minutes walk to Eindhoven centre, and 10 minutes to the train station (where you can get trains to Tilburg (to lead on to Efteling), Rotterdam etc, and buses to Düsseldorf, for example). With regards to the gues house itself, it's in a beautiful setting and is very clean all round. Jos (the owner, I believe) has a very laid back attitude, but is very welcoming and happy to help with any problems (for example, I forgot to sort out a boarding pass for a bus to Germany so he let me use his computer to sort it). Room was above satisfactory, I couldn't fault it! We had a flat screen TV, plenty of wardrobe space and a comfy bed. All in all, I would absolutely recommend. One criticism (although I'm sure this is partly out of the management's control) is that the location of the hotel is not clear.

One criticism (although I'm sure this is partly out of the management's control) is that the location of the hotel is not clear. A Dutch man in the street helped me to locate it, but without his help I wouldn't have arrived easily as it is blended in with other houses and the signage is discrete.

“Felt like home”

Jos (the host) is super nice, helpful and friendly! He speaks many languages and always does his very best to make guests happy (and succeeds all the time!). His house is absolutely gorgeous and everything feels very private and cozy. Our short stay was comfortable and nice. Location is quiet and close to the city, and with a navi it is extremely easy to find.

“Charming, very nice for a leisure trip, not recommended for business trips.”

The location was very good: nice and quiet, yet very close to the city center. The house is picturesque, it has a certain romantic charm. It's definitely nice to spend a few cozy days relaxing, without being bothered.

If you're a business traveler however, I would not recommend staying here, since business trips are all about practicality and the following speaks against this: 1. The check-in time starts too late in my opinion. 2. My room did not have a desk to work at. 3. Cleaning is available only by request. 4. The closet in my room was very old (charming, in accordance with the design of the room), but it was already occupied by a big duvet, and there wasn't any place for my clothes. 5. The Sycamore house does not have a clear indicator pointing to it, so you should really pay attention to the house number, otherwise you will pass it by. 6. Repainting the walls would probably not be a bad idea.

“nice place to stay, but a bit expensive”

room and bathroom were very clean, common kitchen and sitting room to relax and meet other guests

rather a B&B than a hotel, you have to park somewhere in the neighbourhood, not a lot of places. bathroom is for private use, but accessible to all guests as it is outside of the room and requires you to cross the hallway to get to it. No elevator.

“Breakfast was ok.”

Breakfast was ok. Good location. The personnel was friendly.

Very few toilets. The room was very little for 2 people. It's high time they changed shelves (furniture) in the room. It was rather unpleasant.

“It was spacious and peaceful and relaxing.”

It was spacious and peaceful and relaxing. I loved the guitar in the sitting room. Lots of common space, lots of private space. Perfect for someone who does not want to deal with boisterous hotel atmosphere. Perfect for myself travelling alone and wanting a calm place to retreat to. Also a really good place for families though. Were I travelling with a family, I'd probably really love this place. I'd come again.

The shower & toilet is very basic. Not a huge complaint - its clean and does its job, its just kind of not as fancy and spacious as the rest of the place

Nothing was good

we changed our accommodation from hof van alexander boutique hotel to sycamore to be near the airport for a morning flight. On arrival to sycamore, Wouter opened and first invited us to visit the breakfast room. we were shocked to see the massy room which had a bad smell. He explained where the breakfast goods were so we can help ourselves in the morning. then he showed us our bedroom and asked if we need something else. we asked for a couple of more pillows. we were given unironed possibly used once. he asked us for cash payment and issued receipt. that was the last time we saw wouter. he was not present in the morning when we left. the mattress almost touching the floor a good thing if you fall from the bed you won't get hurt but you can hit you head cause standing up there is no head room. the furniture is old and broken. in the shower no space for wash hand basin which is placed in front of the bed. surely needs refurbishing. surely we don't visit this hotel again and strongly not to be recommended waste of money.

“Great location and great friendly, helpful people.”

Great location and great friendly, helpful people. Property was well maintained.

It was sometimes difficult to get in touch with the host with questions about the area. When the host was available, he was great.

“Friendly house in leafy environment”

Felt like being in a friendly shared house,in a leafy environment in an otherwise quite stark city (heavily bombed in WW2 so mostly newly built), close to good restaurants

“Great place and concept. Felt like home.”

Felt like living in a friend's house. Clean and welcoming. Suited our needs perfectly.

“Great place, great location & friendly host!”

Lovely building in a great part of Eindhoven - very leafy street with some enormous houses. Sycamore is a great place, very friendly and an easy trip into town or the main station. Jos is a very friendly host.

Not really a bad experience, but because of the unusual hot weather in Eindhoven, one of the rooms was like a sauna. Not Jos' fault at all, but perhaps some fans may be an idea in the future.

“Despite my leg injury it was a very nice stay and a warm welcome”

- helpful host - nice room - quite place - nice neighbourhood

stairs - but this was just a minor problem due to my leg injury and reduced mobility

“The owner is very fascinating and charming- -also a fabulous. ”

The owner is very fascinating and charming- -also a fabulous piano player! The hotel is stylish,soulful and inviting.

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