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Readings In Indian Railway Finance - Isbn:9788171881215

Category: Railroads

  • Book Title: Readings in Indian Railway Finance
  • ISBN 13: 9788171881215
  • ISBN 10: 8171881211
  • Author: K. B. Verma
  • Category: Railroads
  • Category (general): Railroads
  • Publisher: Academic Foundation
  • Format & Number of pages: 467 pages, book
  • Synopsis: The investment policy of Indian Railways has been outlined in the Corporate Plan which is put into execution through ... by different railways at different points of time. Table 1 is arranged in descending order of TU/Capital ratios (base data in ...

Another description

History of rail transport in India

History of rail transport in India

Extent of Indian Railway network in 1909

The history of rail transport in India began in the mid-nineteenth century.

Prior to 1850, there were no railway lines in the country. This changed with the first railway in 1853. Railways were gradually developed, for a short while by the British East India Company and subsequently by the Colonial British Government. primarily to transport troops for their numerous wars, and secondly to transport cotton for export to mills in UK. Transport of Indian passengers received little interest till 1947 when India got freedom and started to develop railways in a more judicious manner. [ 1 ]

By 1929, there were 66,000 km (41,000 mi) of railway lines serving most of the districts in the country. At that point of time, the railways represented a capital value of some £687 million, and carried over 620 million passengers and approximately 90 million tons of goods a year. [ 2 ] The railways in India were a group of privately owned companies, mostly with British shareholders and whose profits invariably returned to Britain. [ 3 ] The military engineers of the East India Company. later of the British Indian Army, contributed to the birth and growth of the railways which gradually became the responsibility of civilian technocrats and engineers. However, construction and operation of rail transportation in the North West Frontier Province and in foreign nations during war or for military purposes was the responsibility of the military engineers. [ 2 ]

The linking of the Indian Railways

The first train in the country had run between Roorkee and Piran Kaliyar on December 22, 1851 to temporarily solve the then irrigation problems of farmers, large quantity of clay was required which was available in Piran Kaliyar area, 10 km away from Roorkee. The necessity to bring clay compelled the engineers to think of the possibility of running a train between the two points. [ 4 ] In 1845, along with Sir Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy. Hon. Jaganath Shunkerseth (known as Nana Shankarsheth) formed the Indian Railway Association. Eventually, the association was incorporated into the Great Indian Peninsula Railway. and Jeejeebhoy and Shankarsheth became the only two Indians among the ten directors of the GIP railways. As a director, Shankarsheth participated in the very first commercial train journey in India between Bombay and Thane on 16 April 1853 in a 14 carriage long train drawn by 3 locomotives named Sultan, Sindh and Sahib. It was around 21 miles in length and took approximately 45 minutes.

A British engineer, Robert Maitland Brereton. was responsible for the expansion of the railways from 1857 onwards. The Calcutta -Allahabad -Delhi line was completed by 1864. The Allahabad-Jabalpur branch line of the East Indian Railway opened in June 1867. Brereton was responsible for linking this with the Great Indian Peninsula Railway, resulting in a combined network of 6,400 km (4,000 mi). Hence it became possible to travel directly from Bombay to Calcutta via Allahabad. This route was officially opened on 7 March 1870 and it was part of the inspiration for French writer Jules Verne 's book Around the World in Eighty Days. At the opening ceremony, the Viceroy Lord Mayo concluded that "it was thought desirable that, if possible, at the earliest possible moment, the whole country should be covered with a network of lines in a uniform system". [ 5 ]

By 1875, about £95 million (equal to £117 billion in 2012) were invested by British companies in Indian guaranteed railways. [ 6 ] It later transpired that there was heavy corruption in these investments, on the part of both, members of the British Colonial Government in India, and companies who supplied machinery and steel in Britain. This resulted in railway lines and equipment costing nearly double what they should have costed. [ 1 ]

By 1880 the network route was about 14,500 km (9,000 mi), mostly radiating inward from the three major port cities of Bombay. Madras and Calcutta. By 1895, India had started building its own locomotives and in 1896 sent engineers and locomotives to help build the Uganda Railways .

In 1900, the GIPR became a British government owned company. The network spread to the modern day states of Assam. Rajasthan. Telangana and Andhra Pradesh and soon various independent kingdoms began to have their own rail systems. In 1901, an early Railway Board was constituted, but the powers were formally invested under Lord Curzon. It served under the Department of Commerce and Industry and had a government railway official serving as chairman, and a railway manager from England and an agent of one of the company railways as the other two members. For the first time in its history, the Railways began to make a profit.

In 1907, almost all the rail companies were taken over by the government. The following year, the first electric locomotive made its appearance. With the arrival of World War I. the railways were used to meet the needs of the British outside India. With the end of the war, the railways were in a state of disrepair and collapse.

In 1920, with the network having expanded to 61,220 km, a need for central management was mooted by Sir William Acworth. Based on the East India Railway Committee chaired by Acworth, the government took over the management of the Railways and detached the finances of the Railways from other governmental revenues.

The growth of the rail network significantly decreased the impact of famine in India. According to Robin Burgess and Dave Donaldson, "the ability of rainfall shortages to cause famine disappeared almost completely after the arrival of railroads." [ 7 ]

Revenues

The period between 1920 and 1929 was a period of economic boom. Following the Great Depression, however, the company suffered economically for the next eight years. The Second World War severely crippled the railways. Trains were diverted to the Middle East and later, the Far East to combat the Japanese. Railway workshops were converted to ammunitions workshops and some tracks (such as Churchgate to Colaba in Bombay) were dismantled for use in war in other countries. By 1946 all rail systems had been taken over by the government. [ citation needed ]

Electrification

In 1904, the idea to electrify the railway network was proposed by W.H White, chief engineer of the then Bombay Presidency government. He proposed the electrification of the two Bombay-based companies, the Great Indian Peninsula Railway and the Bombay Baroda and Central India Railway (now known as CR and WR respectively).

Both the companies were in favour of the proposal. However, it took another year to obtain necessary permissions from the British government and to upgrade the railway infrastructure in Bombay city. The government of India appointed Mr Merz as a consultant to give an opinion on the electrification of railways. But Mr Merz resigned before making any concrete suggestions, except the replacement of the first Vasai bridge on the BB&CI by a stronger one.

Moreover, as the project was in the process of being executed, the First World War broke out and put the brakes on the project. The First World War placed heavy strain on the railway infrastructure in India. Railway production in the country was diverted to meet the needs of British forces outside India. By the end of the war, Indian Railways were in a state of dilapidation and disrepair.

By 1920, Mr Merz formed a consultancy firm of his own with a partner, Mr Maclellan. The government retained his firm for the railway electrification project. Plans were drawn up for rolling stock and electric infrastructure for Bombay-Poona/Igatpuri/Vasai and Madras Tambaram routes.

The secretary of state of India sanctioned these schemes in October 1920. All the inputs for the electrification, except power supply, were imported from various companies in England.

And similar to the running of the first ever railway train from Bombay to Thane on April 16, 1853, the first-ever electric train in India also ran from Bombay. The debut journey, however, was a shorter one. The first electric train ran between Bombay (Victoria Terminus) and Kurla, a distance of 16 km, on February 3, 1925 along the city’s harbour route.

The section was electrified on a 1,500 volts DC. The opening ceremony was performed by Sir Leslie Wilson, the governor of Bombay, at Victoria Terminus station in presence of a very large and distinguished gathering.

India's first electric locos (two of them), however, had already made their appearance on the Indian soil much earlier. They were delivered to the Mysore Gold Fields by Bagnalls (Stafford) with overhead electrical equipment by Siemens as early as 1910.

Various sections on the railway network were progressively electrified and commissioned between 1925 to 1930.

In 1956, the government decided to adopt 25kV AC single-phase traction as a standard for the Indian Railways to meet the challenge of the growing traffic. An organisation called the Main Line Electrification Project, which later became the Railway Electrification Project and still later the Central Organisation for Railway Electrification, was established. The first 25kV AC traction section in India is Burdwan-Mughalsarai via the Grand Chord.

Corruption in British Indian Railways

Sweeney (2015) Describes the large scale corruption that existed in the financing of British Indian railways, from its commencement in 1850s when tracks were being laid out and later in its operation. [ 8 ] The ruling colonial British government were too focussed on transporting goods for export to Britain, and hence did not use them to transport food instead to prevent famines such as the Great Bengal famines in 1905 and 1942. \Indian economic development was never considered while deciding the rail network or places to be connected. It also resulted in the construction of many white elephants paid for by the natives, as commercial interests lobbied government officials with kickbacks. Government officials of the railways, especially ICS officials, and British nationals who participated in decision making such as James Mackay of Bengal were later rewarded after retirement with directorships in the City or the London headoffices and board rooms of these very so-called Indian railway companies, Poor resource allocation resulted in losses of hundreds of millions of pounds for Indians, including those in opportunity costs. Most shareholders of the railway companies set up were British. The head offices of most of these companies were in London, thus allowing Indian money to flow out of the country legally. Result, the railway debt made up nearly 50% of the Indian national debt from 1903 to 1945. Roberts and Minto spent large amounts trying to develop the Indian railways in the North west frontier province, resultign in large disproportionate losses. Guaranteed and subsidised companies were floated to run the railways, large guarantee payments were made despite there being a famine in Bengal. EIR, GIPR and Bombay Baroda (all operating in India and registered in London) had monopolies which generated profits, however these were never reinvested for the development of India. [ 9 ]

Start of Independent Indian Railways

Following independence in 1947, India inherited a decrepit rail network. About 40 per cent of the railway lines were in the newly created Pakistan. Many lines had to be rerouted through Indian territory and new lines had to be constructed to connect important cities such as Jammu. A total of 42 separate railway systems, including 32 lines owned by the former Indian princely states existed at the time of independence spanning a total of 55,000 km. These were amalgamated into the Indian Railways. Sicne then, independent India has more than quadrupled the length of railway lines in the country.

In 1952, it was decided to replace the existing rail networks by zones. A total of six zones came into being in 1952. As India developed its economy, almost all railway production units started to be built indigenously. The Railways began to electrify its lines to AC. On 6 September 2003 six further zones were made from existing zones for administration purpose and one more zone added in 2006. The Indian Railways has now sixteen zones.

In 1985, steam locomotives were phased out. In 1987, computerization of reservation first was carried out in Bombay and in 1989 the train numbers were standardised to four digits. In 1995, the entire railway reservation was computerised through the railway's internet. In 1998, the Konkan Railway was opened, spanning difficult terrain through the Western Ghats. In 1984 Kolkata became the first Indian city to get a metro rail system. followed by the Delhi Metro in 2002, Bangalore's Namma Metro in 2011 and the Mumbai Metro and Mumbai Monorail in 2014. Many other Indian cities are currently planning urban rapid transit systems.

See also

Source:

en.rfwiki.org

Articles

Indian Railway Map - Railway Map of India, Indian Railways Route Map, India Rail Map

Indian Railway Map

Indian Railway has a vast network of rail tracks throughout the dimensions of India. The network covers 28 states, 3 union territories and some areas of Nepal, Bangladesh and Pakistan. Indian Railways (IR) uses a rail track of 108,805 kms approx in total length; whereas the total route length of the network is not less than 63,465 km. Himsagar Express covers the longest distance of 3751 km on the rail tracks from Jammu Tawi to Kanyakumari.

Indian Railways has divided the country into four main and twelve other zones on the basis of their coverage area, divisions etc. IR is acclaimed to encompass one of the largest rail networks in the world. Indian Railway Map helps in knowing about the wide coverage provided by the trains of India. This railway route map of India would also assist in exploring the all destinations that are served by the Railways. Check out the Rail Map of India.

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Source:

www.iloveindia.com

IRFCA Indian Railways FAQ: Books, Timetables, Videos, etc

Books, Timetables, Videos, etc. - II Books. History, railway descriptions
  • Railways of India
  • by J N Westwood
  • David & Charles. Newton Abbot, 1975
  • ISBN 0-7153-6295-X

A concise and comprehensive history of railways in India

  • Railways of the Raj
  • by M G Satow and R Desmond
  • 1980, Scolar Press, UK

Concise description of development of railways until the early 20th century, human interest, with many period illustrationsand photographs (115 pages of plates)

  • Indian Railways
  • by M A Rao
  • National Book Trust of India, New Delhi, 1975 (3rd edition, 1999)
  • ISBN 81-237-2589-2

Some pictures and some interesting material on IR history, with quite a lot of overlap with Sahni's book (q.v.).

  • Indian railways; one hundred years, 1853 to 1953
  • by Jogendra Nath Sahni
  • 1953, New Delhi, Ministry of Railways (Railway Board)
  • LC Card: 55018553

This book focuses on the early years of railways in India, with little corporate history and virtually no engineering history. The many pictures in this book are rather poorly printed, and the production quality of this book is not very good.

  • Building the Railways of the Raj 1850-1900
  • by Ian J Kerr
  • 1995, 1998, Oxford University Press, UK and USA
  • ISBN 0-19-564238-4, 0-19-563444-6

Focus on construction and spread of railways, and social history thereof, with some strong political theory infused throughout. 284pp, 3 maps, 10 halftones.

  • 27 Down: New Departures in Indian Railway Studies
  • Editor: Ian J Kerr
  • pp. 448, photographs, statistical tables, CD-ROM with additional material
  • 2007, Orient Longman
  • ISBN 978-81-250-3063-8

This book aims to explore some of the neglected dimensions of India's colonial and postcolonial railways. Topics include: Railways and the nineteenth century capitalist development of South Asia, porters at a twenty-first-century Mumbai station, late nineteenth-century Hindi accounts of train travel, post-1947 films and writings that represent railways during the Partition of India, railway art on Bangladeshi rikshas, railway workshop labour, financing and managing the railways of North India, an exploration of why India's railways did not contribute more positively to colonial India's economic development. Included CD-ROM contains bibliography, the film 'Veiled in Vapour' by Gilbert Loreaux and Mukul Mangalik, statistics, and poems.

  • Railways in Modern India
  • by Ian J Kerr
  • Series: Oxford in India Readings: Themes in Indian History
  • 2001, Oxford University Press, UK and USA
  • ISBN 0-19-564828-5

400pp, 3 maps, 1 halftone. Reprints of significant writings on Indian railway history. Historical context, suggested approaches to the study of railway history in India.

  • Halt Station India: The dramatic tale of the nation's first rail lines
  • by Rajendra Aklekar
  • 2014, Rupa Publications
  • pp 227. ISBN 8129134977, ISBN-13 978-8129134974

Rajendra Aklekar, an IRFCA member and journalist based in Mumbai, has compiled a history of the early railway lines in the Mumbai area, with numerous nuggets of information gleaned in his research over the years.

  • Permanent Way through the Khyber
  • Victor Bayley
  • 1934, Jarrods, London

An account of the difficult task of building the tracks to the northwest for the Khyber Railway

  • North West Mail
  • Victor Bayley
  • 1939, Robert Hale, London
  • pp 352
  • Couplings to the Khyber
  • by P.S.A. Berridge
  • 1969, David & Charles, Newton Abbott
  • ISBN 7153 4342 4

This is a well-written, predominantly civil engineering history of the N.W.R.

  • History of Bombay Suburban Railways (1853-1985)
  • by Dr A K Arora
  • 1985, Author
  • History of Indian Railways
  • by G. S. Khosla
  • 1988, Ministry of Railways (Railway Board) and A. H. Co. New Delhi (out of print)

Not very well organized in its content. Much emphasis on administrative issues, with little on engineering history.

  • Railways in India. A Legend
  • Covering the origin and development of railways in India from 1830 to 2008.
  • by Sitanshu Shekhar Ghosh
  • 2009, Jogmaya Prakashini, Kolkata
  • Nehru and Indian Railways
  • by A K Arora and B S Misra
  • 1989, Ministry of Railways (Railway Board), New Delhi
  • Line of Communication: Railway to the East
  • by John Thomas

An account of the role of the railways in India in World War II, focusing on the activity in the east in facing off Japan in Burma.

  • A Soldier with Railways
  • by Lt. Col. A. A. Mains
  • 1994, Picton Publishing, Chippenham, England
  • ISBN 0-948251-70-0

Author's memoirs as officer in the 9th Gurkha regiment (1934-1953) in India, Iraq, Syria, and Burma between 1934 and 1953, with a focus on railway experience. Details of locos, rolling stock, and operations.

  • Konkan Railway. A dream come true
  • by Menaka Shivdasani and Raju Kane
  • Konkan Railway Corporation, Ltd.
  • Plot 6, Sector 11, Belapur Bhavan, CBD Belapur, Navi Mumbai 400614 India
  • Anchoring a City Line
  • Sharada Dwivedi and Rahul Mehrotra
  • 2000, Western Railway, Mumbai, INDIA
  • Rs 300 softcover, Rs 500 hardcover
  • ISBN 81-900602-4-4

History and details of WR services (especially suburban), buildings, etc. Many old and new photographs.

Some copies are available from the BORHT for delivery outside India. Write to: British Overseas Railways Historical Trust

  • For deliveries within India, copies are available from:
  • Mr I S Anand
  • E-Mail: isawcm5@yahoo.com
  • Telephone (Mumbai): (+91 22) 307 0389
  • Also: (+91 22) 522 6163 and (+91 22) 527 3840 (before 8am, after 9pm)

Mr Anand can deliver within India, or you may pick up your copy from him in Mumbai.

In New Delhi, copies are available from: The souvenir counter of the National Rail Museum.

  • Garden Reach
  • Subtitled: A Railway Story
  • Saibal Bose
  • pp. 52
  • 2006, South Eastern Railway, Kolkata, INDIA

A history of Garden Reach, which housed the headquarters of the Bengal Nagpur Railway and is still used by the South Eastern Railway. Photographs, facsimiles of early documents, biographies, etc.

  • Renovatio
  • Subtitled: Revival of a Garratt locomotive
  • Saibal Bose and Subhasis Ganguly
  • pp. 100
  • 2007, South Eastern Railway, Kolkata, INDIA
  • ISBN 9788175258266

An account of the restoration of a 1926 Beyer-Peacock Garratt of the Bengal Nagpur Railway, along with historical accounts of Garratts in India and related material.

  • Western Railway Meter Gauge system (Western Railway, 1987)
  • Western Railway Narrow Gauge system (Western Railway, 1987)
  • The Blue Chip Railway (South-Eastern Railway, 1988, ISBN X901613 087)
  • Exotic Indian Mountain Railways ((out of print) Railway Board, 1984)
  • Kalka-Simla & Kangra Valley lines (Northern Railway, 1983)
  • Jodhpur Railway (Northern Railway, 1982)
  • Darjeeling Himalayan Railway (National Rail Museum, 2000)
  • Locomotives in Steam (Railway Board, 1981)
  • Rail Race to Jammu (about the completion of the line from Pathankot ) (published?)
  • Rail Transport Museum (Railway Board, 1980)
  • South Eastern Railway: March to New Millennium (SER, 2001) Includes history of BNR.

All by R.R. Bhandari, the first curator of the National Rail Museum. The books on specific railway systems are good, concise histories of the systems, with specific information on dates of opening of various lines, etc. and with fairly good quality black-and-white and colour plates.

No ISBNs for some of these. The older ones are generally long out of print. Some of these may still be available from the National Rail Museum in New Delhi. A few are also available from the British Overseas Railways Historical Trust. The book on the DHR is a new one (available at the NRM), and is the first in a new series planned on the mountain railways, including material re-issued from the book Exotic Indian Mountain Railways along with some new material.

  • Western Railway: A Glorious Saga
  • by R R Bhandari
  • Published by Western Railway, 2008

The book traces the history of Western Railway from its precursor the BB&CI Railway; pictures, facts and figures.

  • Mumbai Local
  • by Vimal Mishra
  • In Hindi
  • Published by Western Railway, 2008

History of the WR and CR Mumbai suburban system - railway stations, impact on society - anecdotes from commuters, pieces by well-known figures.

  • Dak Tikton Ka Safar ("The journey of railway stamps" )
  • by A K Jhingron, ex-GM of Western Railway
  • In Hindi
  • Published by Western Railway, 2010

Treatise on postal stamps with a railway theme, with a catalogue of many rare and notable stamps.

  • Heritage, Legends, and Traditions
  • by A K Jhingron, ex-GM of Wesgtern Railway
  • Published by Western Railway, 2010

Treatise on the heritage of Western Railway - covers documentation and archives, photographs, and preserved artifacts. Includes a chapter on documentation of WR relics of heritage significance, by IRFCA member Rajendra Aklekar.

  • Line Clear to India
  • Subtitled: Incorporating Rowland MacDonald Stephenson's "Report Upon Introduction of Railways into India - 1844"
  • by A Ramarao
  • (NRM Heritage Series Volume 1). 1998, Ministry of Railways (Railway Board), Govt. of India, New Delhi

Selected official reports, correspondence, etc. related to the inception and early growth of railways in India, including a reprint of the Stephenson report.

  • The Final Frontiers
  • Published by Northeast Frontier Railways
  • 2003. 300pp, maps, colour photographs and sketches.

Coverage of the railways of northeast India and their history, including the DHR, Assam Bengal Railway, etc.

Account of the efforts to forge steamship and railway links between Europe and India. Covers battles, diplomacy, engineering, and social and political history. Includes maps

  • Raj in Sunset
  • Phillip Napier
  • 1961, Arthur H. Stockwell, Ilfracombe

Author's career as a Railway Official in India.

The book describe historical and biographical incidents on Indian Railway. It focuses on human elements, its development and potential and highlights the importance of research and technological upgradation of Indian Railways to effectively play its national and social roles.

  • Pacific Locomotive Committee 1938-39: Report
  • 1939, Delhi

More on the XB Pacific class.

  • Indian Railways: Calcutta Electrification
  • (subtitled) 3000V DC Locomotives Class EM/2 Operation
  • by the English Electric Company Ltd.
  • Date Unknown
  • Report on the Practicability and Advantages of the Introduction of Railways to British India
  • by R MacDonald Stephenson
  • 1868, London. Printed by Kelly & Co.

Early proposals for railways in India, with official and unofficial correspondence and trade figures and projections. See the NRM publication "Line Clear to India", published in 1998, which incorporates this report.

  • Indian Railways and their Probable Results
  • Sir William Patrick Andrew
  • 1848, 150pp, maps

Author was a pioneer of the railways and promoter of the military, political, and commercial benefits of railways and telegraphs in India.

  • The Railways of India
  • E (Edward?) Davidson (possibly G Davidson?)
  • 1868, E. & F.N. Spon, London
  • pp 384, plates, maps

With an account of their rise, progress and construction - written with the aid of the records of the India Office.

  • Indian Railways: Reports by and about the Indian Railway Companies
  • John Clark Marshman
  • 1868. Publisher unknown.
  • 30pp.

Article formerly published in the Quarterly Review.

  • Railways in British India
  • by H. Trevor
  • 1891, London
  • History of the North Western Railway
  • B. de Villeroi
  • 1896, Published by the Author, Lahore
  • Light Railways for the United Kingdom, India and the Colonies
  • John Charles Mackay
  • 1896, Crosby Lockwood & Son, London
  • pp 322
  • Pioneer Irrigation and Light Railways Manual of information for farmers in the Colonies
  • Ernest O. Mawson and Everard Richard Calthrop
  • with additional chapters on light railways by E.R. Calthrop.
  • 1904, London, Crosby Lockwood and Son
  • Indian Railways
  • K. V. Aiyar
  • 1st ed. 1924, pp 131 India of Today, Vol 7 Oxford University Press, London
  • 2nd ed. 1925, pp 133 India of Today, Vo1 7 Oxford University Press, London & Madras
  • Development of Indian Railways
  • Nalinaksha Sanyal
  • 1930, University of Calcutta
  • pp 397, photos, maps
  • Colonization, Defence, and Railways in our Indian Empire
  • Hyde Clark
  • Date and publisher unknown.
  • Full Steam Ahead
  • Issued by the Press Information Bureau, Government of India for the Railway Board
  • 1946? Printed by Times of India Press, Bombay
  • pp 56, 93 halftones, maps

A typical morale boosting wartime booklet. Brief history of Indian Rlys and the demands made on them by war and how they were met. Data about traffic, etc. and ideas on what was to happen on the Railways immediately post-war.

An account of the refugee traffic after Partition.

  • History of the Great Indian Peninsular Railway
  • by S N Sharma
  • Part 1, Vol. 1. 1853-1869
  • Part 1, Vol. 2. 1870-1900
  • 1985 (vol. 1), 1990 (vol. 2)
  • Published by the Chief Public Relations Officer, Central Railway, Bombay V.T.
  • The early history of the East Indian Railway: 1845-1879
  • by Hena Mukherjee
  • 1966, PhD dissertation, London University, London
  • 1994, ISBN 8171020038 South Asia Books
  • Firma KLM (P) Ltd. 257-B, B.B. Ganguly Street, Calcutta 700012 INDIA

History of EIR: planning, fund-raising, land acquisition, cargo carried, and economic impact on the eastern region.

  • History of the East Indian Railway
  • by George Huddleston
  • Vol. 1, 1906, Thacker Spink & Co. Calcutta
  • Vol. 2, 1939, St Stephens, Bristol Press, Bristol
  • Migration of British Capital to 1875
  • by L. Jenks
  • 1927, New York

Early plans for railways in India and the difficulties of financing them.

  • Investment in Empire. British Rail and Steam Shipping Enterprise in India, 1825-1849
  • by Daniel Thorner and Mira Wilkins (Ed.)
  • ISBN 0405097239
  • 1950, 1977, Ayer Company Publishers, Inc.
  • History of Indian Railways: Constructed and in progress
  • Government of India, Railway Department (Railway Board)
  • Simla, Government of India Press, periodical

Details of all railway operations in India from the middle of the 19th century, with dates of opening of routes, train running arrangements, contract dates and information, and many maps. This was an annual publication; the issues were produced until the 1960s or so.

  • Railway Systems of India, Ceylon, Siam, and Malaya
  • The First and Second Special Indian and Eastern Numbers of The Railway Gazette, Nov. 11 and Dec. 2, 1929, republished.
  • 152pp, 168 full-page plates, plans, maps.
  • 1929, London.

Historical record of Indian and south-east Asian railways, with pictures.

  • Report by the Railway Board on Indian Railways
  • 1930, Calcutta, Government of India

Annual publication, usually two volumes in each year. Passenger and freight traffic statistics, revenue, etc.

  • Adminstration Report on the Railways in India
  • British Parliamentary Papers, published annually
  • Annual, up to the 1940s, HMSO, London. Also Simla.

Usually including maps, charts, photographs and illustrations of rolling stock, etc. Usually in two volumes; one with descriptions, maps, illustrations, and the other with tabulated data on finances, traffic, etc.

  • Railway Construction In India in 3 volumes
  • Indian Council of Historical Research
  • ISBN: 81-7211-102-9 [1999, xlii, 572 pages, 25 cm. Hard Cover
  • Available from Books of India, affiliated with Bibliofind/Amazon .
  • Approximate price US $450.00

The history of Indian railway construction of the 19 century could be divided into the following three broad phases. 1. Under old terms of guarantee system (1844-1869); 2. Under state supervision and management (1869-1879); and 3. Under the terms of new guarantee system (1879-1900). The present study aims at presenting the documents of vital importance for writing such a history.

  • Illustrated Guide to the South Indian Railway Company,
  • Including the Mayavaram-Mutupet and Peralam-Karaikkal Railways
  • 1900, Higginbotham, Madras
  • 1910, South Indian Railway Company, London
  • 466pp (1910 ed. 368pp.), map
  • South Indian Railway: Travel, Scenery, Sports, Health Resorts, Ancienet Monuments & Temples in South India
  • 1913 (?), South Indian Railway
  • 41pp. incl. 30 pages of full-page photographs, map

Guide book of tourist sites and description of railway system

  • South Indian Railway Co. Illustrated Guide
  • Madras, Hoe & Co. Premier Press, 1921, pp. 248

Hints for travellers,routes,Hindu customs etc. and the Nilgiri railway

  • The Traveller's Companion - Containing a Brief Description of Places of Pilgrimage and Important Towns in India
  • by Abdur Rasheed
  • Superintendent Government Printing, India, 1907. 275pp.

Profusely illustrated with black and white photographs, frontispiece map of the Indian Railway system, exhaustive description of the railways in India at the beginning of the 20th century.

  • The Indian Railway Travellers' Guide.
  • The 'Bombay Gazette' Steam Press, Nov. 1891. pp. 224, Bombay

Containing the special time and fare tables of all the Indian railway companies, steam boats and dak companies, places of interest along the coast, postal and telegraphic information, the routes between the principal towns of Northern, Central, Southern, and Western India, etc. "corrected up to 30th June 1890"

  • The Nizam's State Railway Commemorative Book (about 1940)
  • Darjeeling - Himalayan Railway Co
  • Darjeeling and its mountain railway. A guide and souvenir
  • Author unknown; the compilers' preface signed 'R.B.A.'
  • 1921, Caledonian Printing Co, Calcutta for the Darjeeling Himalayan Railway Co.
  • 1983 reprint, Jetsum Publishing House, Darjeeling.
  • Illustrated Guide for Tourists to the Darjeeling Himalayan Railway and Darjeeling
  • 1896 (second printing), Darjeeling Himalayan Railway
  • Reprinted by Pagoda Tree Press, Malvern Buildings, Fairfield Park, Bath BA1 6JX, England

With many engravings and photographs, pp 106

  • Delhi Durbar Railway:Traffic administration report
  • 1912, Delhi Durbar Railway
  • Two Volumes, maps
  • Light Railways, their rise and decline
  • W.J.K. Davies
  • 1964, Ian Allan, London
  • Adapting Steam Locomotive Boilers to lower Grade Coal
  • (Article on Giesl ejectors for Indian Railways)
  • Dr Adolph Giesl-Gieslingen
  • Indian Railways (periodical), New Delhi, February 1961
  • Developments in Steam Traction
  • (Article on Giesl ejectors for Indian Railways)
  • Dr Adolph Giesl-Gieslingen
  • Steam, Diesel & Electric Traction Engineer (periodical), Tanjore, India, May 1962
  • Design for Ease of Application and Maintenance - The Giesl Ejector for Steam Locomotives
  • (Article on Giesl ejectors for Indian Railways)
  • The Indian Railways Workshop Magazine, May-July 1962
  • Dr Adolph Giesl-Gieslingen
  • Increasing Steam Locomotive Capacity
  • (Article on Giesl ejectors for Indian Railways)
  • Dr Adolph Giesl-Gieslingen
  • The Indian Railway Engineer (periodical), July-September 1963
  • Wheels of India
  • John Mitchell and A. M. William
  • 1934, Thornton Butterworth, London
  • pp 319, plates

Autobiographical reminiscences of a Railway Official in India. Coverage of the Bengal Nagpur Rly.

  • The History Of The Railway Thieves In India
  • With illustrations and hints on detection
  • No. 1, The Criminal Tribes of India Series
  • Rai Bahadur M Pauparao Naidu (M Paparau Nayadu), Madras Police
  • ISBN: 81-85326-87-8
  • 1915, Higginbothams Ltd. Madras, also republished
  • Pamban Viaduct, South Indian Railway
  • by Colin Robert White

Excerpted minutes of proceeds of the Instn. Civil Engineers, vol. 199, session 1914-15. 1915, Institution of Civil Engineers, London

  • Railway Reports: Report and estimate of the Baroda Railway
  • by Arthur A West and others
  • 1850, 1851, Bombay

Detailed proposal and estimates for Baroda Railway, including land surveys, sketch maps, economic analyses, etc. foreshadowing the BBCI Rly.

  • The Electrification of the Suburban and certain Main-line Sections of the Great Indian Peninsular Railway
  • by F Lydall
  • 1932, London

Reprint of a paper presented to the Institution of Electrical Engineers on April 28, 1932

  • Madras Railway Company: Pictorial Guide
  • by F Dunsterville
  • 1902, Higginbothams, Madras
  • The Frontier Mail: India's fastest daily service to Delhi, Lahore, and Peshawar
  • 1900s? BB&CI Rly.

Souvenir book with photographs of landscape and route.

  • Bridges on the northern section of the Nagda-Muttra State Railway
  • by John Kerr Robertson
  • 1913, Institution of Civil Engineers, London

Excerpts of Instn. of Civil Engineers proceedings, vol. 193, session 1912-13.

  • Through Rajputana to Delhi
  • by Carlton Stubbs
  • 1907, Bombay Times Press, Bombay

An illustrated guide to the areas served by the BB&CI Rly. B&W photos

  • Bradshaw's Railway Manual, Shareholders' Guide and Directory
  • by Henry Blacklock (1891)
  • Published periodically
  • 1891, London

Details of UK, British Colonial, and other British-owned railways. Administrative details, fold-out maps, staff directories.

  • Palestine, Egypt, and India Connected by a Railway System
  • by S McBean
  • 1876, W H Allen, London

Non-technical exposition with plenty of proposals for various international railway connections.

  • The Reconstruction of the Empress Bridge over the River Sutlej
  • by Jon Douglas Watson and William Macrae
  • Reprint from proceedings of the ICE, vol. 237, 1933-34
  • 1935, Institution of Civil Engineers, London
  • The Regirdering of the Railway Bridge over the Krishna River, Madras and Southern Mahratta Railway
  • by Harold Nugent Colam
  • Reprint from proceedings of the ICE, vol. 227, 1928-29
  • 1929, Institution of Civil Engineers, London
  • General Rules for All Open Lines of Railways in British India Administered by the Government with the Bengal and Assam Railway
  • 1944, East Indian Railway Press, Calcutta
  • Exploration Survey for a Railway Connection between India, Siam, and China
  • by Holt S Hallett
  • pp 20, map
  • 1886, Royal Geographical Society, London
  • Geological Notes on the Central Railway Tunnels of the Western Ghats, India
  • by B C Roy
  • Bulletin of the Geological Survey of India, Series B: Engineering Geology and Ground Water, No. 12
  • 1958, Controller of Publications, New Delhi
  • Biographical Directory of Railway Engineers
  • by Marshall
  • Railway Canal and Historical Society
  • ISBN 0901461229
  • 2003, Oxford
  • The Koochpurwanaypore Swadeshi Railway
  • Joe Hookum (pseudonym, real name W H Deakon)
  • Sepia drawings, paper covers
  • Around 1900, Thacker, Spink, and Co. Calcutta and Simla

Humorous sketches on the state of the railways in India. Originally published for the GIP Railway Magazine. Title translates to "It-doesn't-matter city, home-made railway"; author's pseudonym translates to "At your service".

  • Jute-Waste. Indian Railway Rhymes
  • E B Chase
  • 24mo, 47pp.
  • 1923, Erskine Macdonald, Ltd. London
  • Hints to Young Engineers employed on Indian Railways
  • A. Addis
  • pp 154
  • 1910, E & F.N. Spon. London
  • The Indian Railway Servant's Manual
  • by J. Hardless
  • Compendium of railway rules and procedures
  • 1898, Calcutta
Books. Travel information, railway network
  • India by Rail
  • by Royston Ellis
  • 1st ed. 1989, 3rd ed. 1997
  • ISBN 1-898323-49-6
  • Bradt Travel Guides, Bradt Publications (UK) http://www.bradt-travelguides.com, or
  • The Globe Pequot Press (USA, 1997), or Hunter (USA, 1987 1st ed.)
  • Discover India by Rail
  • by Sandeep Silas
  • Sterling, India, 2001

Basic tourist information on 100+ destinations and rail tours with tips for rail travel. Covers most of the rail routes in India.

  • Alphabetical List of Indian Railway Stations
  • Subtitled: All-Indian Rly. Distance Table and Code Book
  • by M. K. Jain
  • No ISBN
  • 1997 (?) Prince Publication, G. T. Road, Shahdara, New Delhi

Contains an extensive list of stations with their codes, distances from New Delhi, and route information.

  • Alphabetical List of Railway Stations in India
  • No ISBN
  • Published by the Indian Railway Conference Association.

Contains a comprehensive list of passenger and goods stations, sidings, cabins, etc. Published irregularly every few years. The last one was published in 1995.(?) Available from offices of the Chief Commercial Managers of the zonal railways.

  • Indian Railways -- A Commercial Guide for Railwaymen and Rail Users
  • S C Halder
  • pp 399
  • 2001, K K Lodha / Kamal Law House, 8/2 Kiran Shankar Ray Road, Calcutta

Commercial rules and procedures, information for commercial department staff.

  • Railway Map of India
  • Edmund W Fearn
  • Lithographed map, prepared for Newman's Indian Bradshaw
  • Undated. Not in print.
Books. Operations and engineering
  • Paper on the Bhore Ghaut Incline of the Great Indian Peninsular Railway
  • by James John Berkley
  • Submitted to the Bombay Mechanics Institute
  • 1858, 1863, The Education Society Press, Byculla
  • Railway Signalling in India
  • by Charles William Hodson
  • Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers, 1909-1910, Part II
  • 1909, Institution of Civil Engineers.
  • Railway Signalling: Theory and Practice
  • by S T Dutton
  • (in the series "Lockwood's Manuals")
  • 1928, Technical Press, London.

Indian signalling principles and practice described.

  • The Hump Yard in India, by H. W. Wagstaff
  • Calcutta, East Indian Railway Press (date?)

Notes on the hump yards based on compiled from data made available in the Railway Board's Office, and from visits paid to most of the more important hump yards in India.

  • Freight Yards, Terminals, and Trains: Indian Practice
  • by S C Ghose
  • 1925? Publisher unknown.
  • Railway Operation
  • by Francis Da Costa
  • Publisher??
  • Advanced Railway Operation
  • by Francis Da Costa
  • Publisher??

These two books above have operational details of IR.

  • Electric Traction
  • by H Partab
  • Publisher??
  • A Textbook of Railway Engineering
  • S. C. Saxena and S. Arora
  • 1st ed. 1973, then 1975, 1977, 1979, 1981 Dhanpat Rai and Sons, Delhi
  • Railway Track
  • K. F. Antia
  • 1st ed. 1945, 2nd ed. 1949, 3rd ed. 1954, 4th ed. 1957, 5th ed. 1960, progressively revised
  • New Book Co, Bombay
  • Railway Track
  • K. F. Antia
  • 1st ed. 1945, 2nd ed. 1949, 3rd ed. 1954, 4th ed. 1957, 5th ed. 1960, progressively revised
  • New Book Co, Bombay
  • Railway Track Engineering by Agar
  • (publisher?)
  • Railway Bridges and Tunnels
  • by Vazirani and Chandola
  • (publisher?)
  • Railway Track (Practical)
  • Wheeler and D. S. Thakur
  • 1988, Vernam & Co, Sahampur, U.P. (third, revised and enlarged edition)
  • Modern Railway Signalling (principles and practice)
  • M. K. Kaul
  • 1983, Bahri Brothers, Delhi
  • Railway Land Management - A Practical Approach
  • Rakesh Kumar
  • 5 Aab Prakashan, Jalandhar
  • Transportation Technology of the Millennium
  • (Seminar Proceedings)
  • 2001, Central Railway
Books. Regional and world railways
  • Hundred years of Pakistani Railways
  • M. Malik
  • 1962, Ministry of Railways & Communications Railway Board, Karachi

Much overlap with Sahni's book on Indian Railways for the early history of railways in the subcontinent. All the material is on West Pakistan (as it was then) with hardly anything on East Pakistan (as it was then).

  • Railways of Sri Lanka
  • by David Hyatt
  • 416pp. 31 maps, diagrams, 200 halftones. A4 format.
  • ISBN 0-9537304-0-9
  • 2000, COMRAC, Wembley, Middlesex, UK; London, UK; Colombo, Sri Lanka

The most comprehensive account of railways in Sri Lanka. Mostly deals with Sri Lanka Railways (formerly Ceylon Government Railways) but also has material on Port Authority Railway, etc. Historical development of network, patterns of service, signalling and operating systems, detailed list of all motive power, maps, tabulations of heights and distances, diagrams of major junctions.

  • Afghanistan: A Railway History
  • by Dr Paul E Waters
  • ISBN 0-948904-09-7
  • 2002, P E Waters & Associates, 105 Highland Road, Bromley, Kent BR1 4AA, England

Comprehensive account of proposed and actual railways in Afghanistan and on its borders. Includes photographs, drawings, and maps, 47pp.

  • Middle Eastern Railways
  • by Hugh Hughes
  • 1981, London: Continental Railway Circle
  • ISBN 0 9503469 7 7

This has a short but very informative account of Iranian railways, under its various names, and other railways in the middle East.

  • Railways of the World
  • by Brian Hollingsworth
  • Gallery Books (a division of W. H. Smith Publishers Inc.), NY

This book provides a country-by-country account of the world's railways, and has numerous photographs and maps.

  • Railways of Asia and the Far East
  • O.S. Nock
  • 1978, London, Adam & Charles Black

117 pages on India, with illustrations.

  • The Pictorial Encyclopedia of Railways
  • by Hamilton Ellis
  • 1968, Paul Hamlyn

20 Indian photographs, including one of a Sharp Stewart 4-6-0ST of 1862 of the GIPR.

  • Ceylon Government Railway, Cave (1910)
  • Jules Verne's Express
  • Werner Solch
  • 1980, Alba Press, Dusseldorf

(German) About the Indian Mail route from the UK to India, with a long section on Indian railways

  • Expresszuge im Vorderen Orient (Express Trains in the Near East)
  • Werner Solch
  • 1989, Alba Press, Dusseldorf

German) This has a section on railways in Pakistan and a discussion of the Trans-Asian Railway project

  • Narrow Gauge the World Over
  • P. Whitehouse and P. Allen
  • 1976, Ian Allan, London
  • The Atlas of Train Travel
  • J. B. Hollingsworth
  • 1980, Sidgwick & Jackson, London
  • Atlas of the World's Railways
  • J. B. Hollingsworth
  • 1980, Bison Books, London
Books. Economics, policy, organization
  • Indian Railway Finance
  • Venkata Vemuri Ramanadham
  • pp 184
  • 1956, Atma Ram & Sons, Delhi
  • Transport Development in India
  • S. K. Srivastava
  • 2nd ed. pp 286 (revised & enlarged)
  • 1956, Publishing House, Ghaziabad
  • Railways in Modern India
  • R Tivari
  • 1941, Bombay
  • Economics of Indian Rail Transport
  • J. Johnson
  • 1960, Bombay
  • Remarks on the Indian Railways Reports published by the Government,
  • and Reasons for a Change of Policy in India
  • by John Dickinson (Chairman, Indian Reform Society)
  • 1862, London, P. S. King
  • The Law relating to Railways in British India including the Indian Railways Act 1890 etc
  • Henry Edward Trevor
  • pp 447
  • 1891, Reeve & Turner, London
  • Railway Policy in India
  • Horace Bell
  • pp vii 359
  • 1894, Rivington Percival & Co, London
  • Recent Railway Policy in India
  • Horace Bell
  • reprinted from the Journal of the Society of Arts
  • 1900, H & F Millard, London
  • State Management & Control of Railways in India. A Study of Railway Finance Rates and Policy During 1920-37, by L. A. Natesan
  • Calcutta: University of Calcutta, 1946. 496pp.
  • Indian Railways
  • by Amba Prasad
  • A study in Public Utility Administration. pp 435
  • 1960, Asia Publishing House, London & Bombay
  • Indian Railways
  • K. Saxena
  • 1962, Bombay
  • Indian Railways, Problems & Prospects, by R. N. Saxena
  • Four Decades of Indian Railways: 1950-1990
  • by R. N. Saxena
  • ISBN 81-7188-059-2, 81-7188-058-4
  • 1991, 2000, Academic Foundation

A study of the growth of IR in a socio-economic context.

  • An alternative approach to capital productivity and resource allocation on Indian Railways
  • by K. B. Verma
  • ISBN 8171881106
  • 1996, Academic Foundation
  • The Trade Union Movement in Indian Railways
  • by Mahesh K. Mast
  • ISBN 084261379X
  • 1969, Verry, Lawrence Incorporated
  • History of Railway Trade Union Movement, A Study
  • by Nrisingha Chakrabarty
  • Study of railway unions in 2 sections 1952-1946 and 1947-1984
  • 1985, Centre for Indian Trade Unions, New Delhi
  • Human resources management in Indian Railways
  • by M. Gangadhara Rao
  • 1986, Manas Publications
  • ISBN 8170490049
  • Cost Management: A case study of some aspects of Indian Railways
  • by Prem Lal
  • 1988, Anupama Publications
  • ISBN 8185251010
  • Econometric cost functions: A study of Indian Railways
  • by Hari Om Varma
  • 1988, Anmol Publications
  • ISBN 8170410703
  • Indian Railways, Enquiry Committee 1936-7
  • Indian Railways, Rates and Regulations, Mehta
  • Fuel economy on Indian Railways
  • 1954, publisher unknown
  • Economics Of Alternative Fuel Technology In Railway Transport
  • by Arti U. Nanavati
  • 1989, New Delhi, Ajanta Books International
  • Management Of Indian Railways
  • by S M Imamul Haque
  • 1989, publisher unknown
  • Railway Management in India
  • by G. Khosta
  • 1975? publisher unknown
  • Railway Establishment Rules And Labour Laws 1999
  • by B S Mainee
  • ISBN: 81-7274-299-1, 1999, pp. 896

Organization of IR, recruitment, training, pay policies, employment policies, etc.

Timetables Q. Where can I get the "Bradshaw" for Indian Railways?

[6/98] W. Newman & Co. in Calcutta publish the Indian Bradshaw. It costs about Rs 75 (??) for a copy, to which you should add postage charges. They will deliver by registered book post overseas. They offer an annual subscription for about Rs 830 (as of [1/01]. The Bradshaw is widely available in bigger railway stations, too.

Bradshaw department W. Newman & Co 3, Old Court House Street CALCUTTA-700069.

Q. Where can I get "Trains at a glance"?

TAAG lists only the long-distance mail and superfast express trains; you have to refer to the specific zonal timetables for all non-express passenger trains, locals, and shuttle services.

It is published by the Ministry of Railways on the first of July every year, and is available at most railway book stalls. There are also other publications that call themselves "Trains at a glance", and which have broadly similar information, but which are published by various private companies (sometimes these include tourist information as well).

Q. Where can I get the Thomas Cook timetables?

Thomas Cook travel bureaus can usually supply these. There are two main timetables from Thomas Cook; one covers Europe (the "European" timetable) and the other covers Russia and all of Asia (the 'Overseas' timetable). They also publish other rail guides and maps that cover Russia, India, the US, Australia, etc.

In the US and Canada, these are available from Forsyth Travel Services (US tollfree 800.367.7984).

In the UK, contact Thomas Cook Publishing, Dept. TPO/FE/8C, at the following address: PO Box 227, Peterborough PE3 6PU, United Kingdom (phone +44 1733.503571, fax +44 1733.503596)

Q. Where can I get a copy of Rail Duniya?

[6/98] Rail Duniya is in Hindi and English at Rs 20/- per issue. It is published quarterly, and is usually quite up-to-date with the schedules. Write to:

The Editor, Rail Duniya, Motibag Building, Ahead of Bhusawal High School, Bhusawal 425201, District Jalgaon, Maharashtra, India. Tel: +91-2582-23155.

Videos Q. What are some videos available on Indian trains?

Note: Prices below are approximate and may be out of date! Please enquire with the publisher or supplier. In some cases they may be post-paid, and sometimes shipping may be extra.

Nick Lera / Locomotion Pictures

Relics of the Raj :This tape has Gaekwar's Baroda State Railway, 2'6" Western Railway NG network near Baroda, BG steam in Bengal -- WP, 0-6-0, HPS, Bengal NG 2-4-0 at Shantipur, MG in Goa - Steam banking action in Ghat section on the British built 2-8-2, the Nilgiri Line, and lastly about a minute and a half of the Patiala State Monorail.

Toy Train To The Clouds. Final months of 100% steam to Darjeeling, plus historic footage of freight trains. Includes 'Baby Sivok' on its unique main line outing to Agony Point. 75 minutes.

Steam's Indian Summer: A Farewell to Indian Steam With Mark Tully; a farewell tribute to Indian steam. Bankura narrow gauge CC, Mhow Ghat steam cab ride, WL light Pacifics in Punjab, etc. 1994-97. The entire production appeared on Discovery Channel, Travel Channel, etc.

Rails to the North West Frontier Pakistan, 1993-96. Features the Bolan Pass including a long driver's eye view sequence through the tunnels, Mirpur Khas meter gauge (3 steam classes), Samasata CWD, Malakwal inside cylinder locos, the Khyber Pass with its original HGS 2-8-0, and a shot of steam on the Attock Bridge across the Indus. Loco repair sequences including a steam crane lift. Inside cylinder motion of an SPS 4-4-0 filmed from the running board. Total 50 min.

Web site: www.nickleravideo.com. Colour images of the cassette covers can be seen here.

All tapes £19.95 each + p&p.

Signal Box, 1 Albion Street, Anstey, LE7 7DD, UK. By phone: +44 1162362901, fax: +44 11623240401 E-mail: signal_box@talk21.com

[9/98] US: Some of these videos are available from Columbia River Entertainment Group. Phone 800-288-2007 x2045. Their catalogue may have slightly different titles for these. Credit cards, cheques, or money orders.

  • Alcazar Video
  • Steam across the world - west & north India
  • Steam across the world - south India
  • Steam across the world - Pakistan in the 1970's
  • Lineside Locations
  • Steam in Pakistan
  • Rails to N.W.Frontier - Pakistan
  • Railfilms
  • Indian steam sunset volumes 1,2 & 3
  • Indus Express (Pakistan)
  • Roy Laverick
  • Darjeeling
  • Steam in the sub-continent
  • Indian Summer
  • East Revisited (India and China)
  • Ray Freeman
  • India, volumes 1,2 & 3

Volume 1 covers North, Western & Central Railways. Volume 2 covers South Eastern, South Central & Southern Railways.

Covers BG and MG steam action in India, including the Ooty line.

Eisenbahn Video can be reached by mail at: D-1704 Obersulm, PO 111, Germany. Phone: +49 7134.14294.

  • The BBC
  • Great Railways - The Flying Scotman
  • Great Railway Journeys Of The World - India

The Flying Scotman tape has an introduction by Mr.O.S.Nock and also features "The Romance Of Indian Railways" narated by Mr.Satow (founder of our National Railway Museum - Delhi). (Perhaps not available now??)

This is the 2-hour segment on various aspects of IR which appeared (still does, occasionally) on PBS TV stations in the US. It is very well-done, with a wide cross-section of passengers, railway staff, trains, and locations.

Goodheart Productions
Indian Steam Sunset. 3 volumes
All kinds of steam action in India, including the Darjeeling and Ooty lines, Tweed, etc. The volumes are each about an hour long.
Indus Express
Steam in Pakistan

A range of DVD productions covering steam and electric railways and tramways in India, Europe, South America and Australia. All productions are in DVD format, but a small number of older productions remain available on NTSC. (Please enquire.)

Darjeeling Delights
The Darjeeling Himalayan Railway, shot in January 1997, when the line was still all steam. Includes scenes at Batasia, Chunbati, and Agony Point loops, zig-zags 1 and 4, and Kurseong Bazaar. 53 minutes, all-digital. Map, diagrams 120 mins; $A39.95.

The Ooty Rack
Filmed in Jan. 1997, April 1999, and September 2004; includes 4 short scenes on Super-8 movie film and some still shots dating back to 1973. Focus is on the rack, but this production shows trains operating over the full length of the line, including YDM4 diesels and the oil-burner. Digitally edited. Maps, diagrams. 95 min; $A34.95.

Last wisps of Indian steam
MG steam on the Bari Sadri branch near Udaipur in Jan. 1997, and on the Wankaner - Morvi - Maliya Miyana section in April 1999. 53 minutes. All digital. Includes maps and diagrams. 71 mins. $A29.95.

Calcutta Trams
Digital footage from 1997 and stills dating back to 1970. Covers all lines then running. Local colour. Maps. 55 mins. $A29.95.

Pakistan Steam
Shot in 1982 in Pakistan, this is a clockwise tour around Pakistan's railway system. All important locations are covered, both strategic border lines and the busy commerce of the plains. The Bolan Pass is seen in bitter winter weather, and husky HG/S 2-8-0s shunt at Bostan in deep snow. The Khyber Pass is seen in sunshine all the way to the current terminus at Landi Kotal. On the plains, Sarghoda, Malakwal, Multan, Kundian, Nowshera, Wazirabad, Lahore, Kotri and Karachi are all visited. BESA 0-6-0s and 4-4-0s, IRS XA 4-6-2s, AWD/CWD 2-8-2s, and numerous diesels are seen on mainline and local services. Metre gauge 4-6-0s and 2-8-2s are recorded at Mirpur Khas Junction. Includes stills from slides. Maps. 56 min. $A29.95.

Clouds Rising in the Sky
In September 2004 UNESCO was considering the Nilgiri Mountain Railway in southern India for World Heritage status. This film follows the inspection of the railway for the preparation of the report on which the UNESCO decision would be based. all digital. 38 min; $A19.95.

Never a Toy
Shows the 2007 UNESCO World Heritage inspection of the Kalka-Shimla railway, with diesel and steam. All digital. 59 min. $A29.95.

Indian Railways: Four Short Films
Includes KSR cab rides on steam and railmotor, plus a main line diesel cab ride in Rajastan. All digital. 60 mins, RRP $A29.95 ea.

  • RAILSTUFF DVDs are PAL format. NTSC format can be supplied to special order. Prices as shown above. For shipping costs see our website.
  • In the UK, the videos are available from Camden Miniature Steam Services.

See the Railstuff web site for more information. Payment accepted in cheques or postal money orders in AUSTRALIAN currency; for credit card orders, please go through PayPal. Or write to: Railstuff, PO Box 2155, Graceville East, Queensland 4075, Australia. Phone: +61 7.3278.1990 Fax: +61 7.3278.1805 E-mail: orders@railstuff.com.au

Jay Balakrishna
Indian Railways Videos, Vol. 1, Jan. 2003
115 minutes of IR action, including diesels and electrics. Footage of the Chennai-Villupuram section as well, the only electrified MG section left in India. Digitally recorded; available in DVD-R format only (NTSC or PAL). More information and ordering details are at the web site indicated below. This is the first volume of what will eventually be a series of IR videos.
URL: /

50 minutes of steam in India (Rajasthan) and China (Inner Mongolia). Available on videocassette and DVD. The web site has more information.

Six different sections on various trains; one is on the Palace on Wheels in India (about an hour long). Covers the WDM-2-hauled POW in Rajasthan with commentary on landscape/surroundings, a few other IR shots. DVD.

  • Francoise Gall and Bernard D'Abrigeon
  • India - World's Greatest Train Ride Videos

Train tour of India, New Delhi, Taj Mahal, 7 other cities. 52 minutes. 1995, Publisher's Choice Video

Note: The BBC and National Geographic tapes are available in Bombay. Some of the above are available in general bookstores in Bombay as well as at India Hobby Centre (Marine Lines) and at a few Toy shops which sell educative Video tapes (try Breach Candy area - Amarsons, Roopsons, Benzer and The Cross Words).

Many of the above are also available from Midland Counties Publications and other bookstores carrying railway material.

Maps & Atlases Q. Where can I find maps of the railway networks in India, or topographic maps, etc.?

The railway timetables usually have zonal railway maps attached to the back cover, but these are not very detailed. Some useful railway maps and atlases are listed below:

  • The Great Indian Railway Atlas
  • by Samit Roychoudhury
  • A very detailed railway atlas of India, in 1:1,500,000 scale. Shows about 11,000 locations including existing and closed stations, (fully indexed), divisional/zonal headquarters, sheds and yards, gauge and electrification information, closed lines and lines under construction, most non-IR tracks, and sidings over 2km. Detail maps of urban areas. Legends in English, French, and German. This is by far the best railway atlas covering IR's network that is available currently. Now available in its second edition (2010); the first edition was published in 2005.
  • 102 pages in all; 72 pages of full-colour maps; 235mm x 178mm (9.25" x 7.0"). Softbound; opens flat.
  • Price: India INR 520, UK GBP 23.99, US $34.99; shipping and handling extra.
  • ISBN 81-901457-1-1
  • 2010, Samit Roychoudhury, Kolkata, India
  • For more details and to order, visit the Indian Rail Stufff web site.
  • Indian Railways Route Map
  • by Samit Roychoudhury
  • September 2001
  • Full-colour, digitally produced. Shows details of gauges, single / double multiple lines, electrified sections, zonal and divisional information, workshops, and over 1,200 stations.
  • See the web site: http://www.samit.org/ellipsis/maps.htm for ordering information.
  • A TTK Guide to India's Railways
  • (TTK Discover India Series)
  • ISBN 81-7053-112-8
  • 1996, 2000, TTK Pharma Limited - Printing Division
  • 328 GST Road, Chromepet, Chennai-600044, INDIA
  • India - Railway Atlas
  • (Welcome India Series)
  • ISBN 81-87460-02-4
  • 2000, Indian Map Service
  • Pushkar Estate, Near Ram Mandir, Sector-G, Shastri Nagar, Jodhpur-342003, INDIA

Online maps See the map section of the FAQ for fairly detailed route maps of the Indian Railways network, and some historical maps as well.

There are some other maps of India available online, although very few of them are railway-related.

  • The Indian Railways official web site has a interactive railway network map that is organized by railway zone.
  • General India maps are online at MapsOfIndia.com
  • MapsOfIndia.com has a map of the railway network which is organized by state.
  • The University of California at Berkeley has a collection of 1:250,000 topographic maps of India and Pakistan from the US Army Map Service, most dating to the 1950s.
  • The Digital South Asia Library at the University of Chicago has a collection of early 20th century maps of India .
  • There is an online collection of historical maps at RootsWeb.
  • The University of Texas at Austin has an online collection of maps, including some recent, historical, and thematic maps of India .

Official zonal maps are available with the Chief Engineer's office of each zonal railway; they are not generally available for sale although copies may be obtained from there on occasion. The Railway Staff College in Vadodara also has official zonal and system maps for IR.

Darjeeling Himalayan Railway. An 850mm x 450mm map of the main DHR line by John Gillham is available from the Darjeeling Himalayan Railway Society of the UK. This map does not show relief, nor any roads other than the Cart Road. Another good map of the DHR is one that appeared in the Loco Profile booklet (#23) on Darjeeling Tanks (see the locomotive books section for information on this).

Topographic maps. The Survey of India publishes topographic and other maps at various scales for different regions of India. Small-scale maps and thematic maps of various kinds are easily found. However, it is hard to obtain official and accurate maps, especially topographic maps, of many areas that are treated as sensitive or of military significance (mainly of the north-east of the country, areas in Rajasthan, Punjab, etc. within 50km of the international border, coastal areas within 50km of the shore, and many others).

In particular, based on a 1968 law (Official Order No. F.7(7)/64/D(GS-III) of April 15, 1968) modifying earlier British policy, large-scale maps (i.e. scales larger than 1:250 000 ) are highly restricted for the sensitive areas; maps up to only 1:1000 000 are available for some coastal areas; and toposheets up to 1:25 000 are available to the public for areas of India designated as unrestricted for map distribution purposes. Of some interest are the 1:500 000 Tactical Pilotage charts which are fairly easily available, but these do not show a lot of detail.

Note: The possession, distribution, or export of topographic maps of restricted areas at large scales requires clearance from the Ministry of Defence and sometimes also from the Ministry of Home Affairs, and penalties including imprisonment may apply to anyone found using these within India without official authorization.

Finally, note that old maps (pre-Independence) of India and Indian railways are available in libraries such as the Oriental and India Office collections at the British Library in London, UK.

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